Nepal Himalaya – Everest Base Camp
I wasn’t planning to go to Everest Base Camp but I met some good folks on the trail and had time so I joined them. And I’m glad I did because the views were off the charts and we had some good laughs. This album is from that part of the trip.
ZoomInfo
Nepal Himalaya – Everest Base Camp
I wasn’t planning to go to Everest Base Camp but I met some good folks on the trail and had time so I joined them. And I’m glad I did because the views were off the charts and we had some good laughs. This album is from that part of the trip.
ZoomInfo
Nepal Himalaya – Everest Base Camp
I wasn’t planning to go to Everest Base Camp but I met some good folks on the trail and had time so I joined them. And I’m glad I did because the views were off the charts and we had some good laughs. This album is from that part of the trip.
ZoomInfo
Nepal Himalaya – Everest Base Camp
I wasn’t planning to go to Everest Base Camp but I met some good folks on the trail and had time so I joined them. And I’m glad I did because the views were off the charts and we had some good laughs. This album is from that part of the trip.
ZoomInfo
Nepal Himalaya – Everest Base Camp
I wasn’t planning to go to Everest Base Camp but I met some good folks on the trail and had time so I joined them. And I’m glad I did because the views were off the charts and we had some good laughs. This album is from that part of the trip.
ZoomInfo
Nepal Himalaya – Everest Base Camp
I wasn’t planning to go to Everest Base Camp but I met some good folks on the trail and had time so I joined them. And I’m glad I did because the views were off the charts and we had some good laughs. This album is from that part of the trip.
ZoomInfo
Nepal Himalaya – Everest Base Camp
I wasn’t planning to go to Everest Base Camp but I met some good folks on the trail and had time so I joined them. And I’m glad I did because the views were off the charts and we had some good laughs. This album is from that part of the trip.
ZoomInfo
Nepal Himalaya – Everest Base Camp
I wasn’t planning to go to Everest Base Camp but I met some good folks on the trail and had time so I joined them. And I’m glad I did because the views were off the charts and we had some good laughs. This album is from that part of the trip.
ZoomInfo
Nepal Himalaya – Everest Base Camp
I wasn’t planning to go to Everest Base Camp but I met some good folks on the trail and had time so I joined them. And I’m glad I did because the views were off the charts and we had some good laughs. This album is from that part of the trip.
ZoomInfo
Nepal Himalaya – Everest Base Camp
I wasn’t planning to go to Everest Base Camp but I met some good folks on the trail and had time so I joined them. And I’m glad I did because the views were off the charts and we had some good laughs. This album is from that part of the trip.
ZoomInfo

Nepal Himalaya – Everest Base Camp

I wasn’t planning to go to Everest Base Camp but I met some good folks on the trail and had time so I joined them. And I’m glad I did because the views were off the charts and we had some good laughs. This album is from that part of the trip.

Himalayan Plans & Island Peak
Since I arrived in Nepal over a month ago I’ve seen what an Ontario flatlander like myself would call mountains around the Kathmandu valley. Tomorrow, however, I head off to see what Nepalis call mountains.
The trip starts with a flight into Lukla, the most dangerous airport in the world. If I survive that I’ll begin the trek north towards Namche Bazaar and then into the Everest region. My final destination on the first leg of the trip is Chukkung but on the way I’ll stop to stare at Ama Dablam.
Ama Dablam is one of the most beautiful mountains I’ve ever seen. It’s not the tallest (almost a full 2 vertical kilometres smaller than Everest) but it makes up for it in sheer beauty. I don’t know why I haven’t been able to get this mountain off my mind but I hope to find out by standing in front of it.
I’ll also be climbing a mountain, Island Peak – that’s the second leg. This definitely wasn’t in the original plans (as I have absolutely no mountaineering experience) but when someone mentioned flatlanders like me can climb Island Peak I took the opportunity.
Island Peak was named for it’s position, a lone peak in a sea of glaciers. It’s often called a “trekking peak” which is a little disingenuous, I think, as I’ve seen the pictures and at 6200m it looks like a proper mountain to me.
Both Island Peak and Ama Dablam are neighbours to Everest so I’ll do the 3-day roundtrip to basecamp and then make my way to Gokyo via the Cho La pass. (Gokyo is where most of the Everest panoramas being sold in shops were taken so the views are apparently stupendous). From Gokyo I’ll make my way back to Lukla and then Kathmandu.
The plan is rough and I have time to go on side trips and follow interesting leads. Carroll and Tom have given me the names and numbers to their sherpa friends in the area so I’ll pop in and say ‘hi’ and see where those meetings go. Total length of the trip, between 20-25 days.
See you all soon!
(Photos: me and packing cat, gear, gear in bag, maps, Ama Dablam, Island Peak)
ZoomInfo
Himalayan Plans & Island Peak
Since I arrived in Nepal over a month ago I’ve seen what an Ontario flatlander like myself would call mountains around the Kathmandu valley. Tomorrow, however, I head off to see what Nepalis call mountains.
The trip starts with a flight into Lukla, the most dangerous airport in the world. If I survive that I’ll begin the trek north towards Namche Bazaar and then into the Everest region. My final destination on the first leg of the trip is Chukkung but on the way I’ll stop to stare at Ama Dablam.
Ama Dablam is one of the most beautiful mountains I’ve ever seen. It’s not the tallest (almost a full 2 vertical kilometres smaller than Everest) but it makes up for it in sheer beauty. I don’t know why I haven’t been able to get this mountain off my mind but I hope to find out by standing in front of it.
I’ll also be climbing a mountain, Island Peak – that’s the second leg. This definitely wasn’t in the original plans (as I have absolutely no mountaineering experience) but when someone mentioned flatlanders like me can climb Island Peak I took the opportunity.
Island Peak was named for it’s position, a lone peak in a sea of glaciers. It’s often called a “trekking peak” which is a little disingenuous, I think, as I’ve seen the pictures and at 6200m it looks like a proper mountain to me.
Both Island Peak and Ama Dablam are neighbours to Everest so I’ll do the 3-day roundtrip to basecamp and then make my way to Gokyo via the Cho La pass. (Gokyo is where most of the Everest panoramas being sold in shops were taken so the views are apparently stupendous). From Gokyo I’ll make my way back to Lukla and then Kathmandu.
The plan is rough and I have time to go on side trips and follow interesting leads. Carroll and Tom have given me the names and numbers to their sherpa friends in the area so I’ll pop in and say ‘hi’ and see where those meetings go. Total length of the trip, between 20-25 days.
See you all soon!
(Photos: me and packing cat, gear, gear in bag, maps, Ama Dablam, Island Peak)
ZoomInfo
Himalayan Plans & Island Peak
Since I arrived in Nepal over a month ago I’ve seen what an Ontario flatlander like myself would call mountains around the Kathmandu valley. Tomorrow, however, I head off to see what Nepalis call mountains.
The trip starts with a flight into Lukla, the most dangerous airport in the world. If I survive that I’ll begin the trek north towards Namche Bazaar and then into the Everest region. My final destination on the first leg of the trip is Chukkung but on the way I’ll stop to stare at Ama Dablam.
Ama Dablam is one of the most beautiful mountains I’ve ever seen. It’s not the tallest (almost a full 2 vertical kilometres smaller than Everest) but it makes up for it in sheer beauty. I don’t know why I haven’t been able to get this mountain off my mind but I hope to find out by standing in front of it.
I’ll also be climbing a mountain, Island Peak – that’s the second leg. This definitely wasn’t in the original plans (as I have absolutely no mountaineering experience) but when someone mentioned flatlanders like me can climb Island Peak I took the opportunity.
Island Peak was named for it’s position, a lone peak in a sea of glaciers. It’s often called a “trekking peak” which is a little disingenuous, I think, as I’ve seen the pictures and at 6200m it looks like a proper mountain to me.
Both Island Peak and Ama Dablam are neighbours to Everest so I’ll do the 3-day roundtrip to basecamp and then make my way to Gokyo via the Cho La pass. (Gokyo is where most of the Everest panoramas being sold in shops were taken so the views are apparently stupendous). From Gokyo I’ll make my way back to Lukla and then Kathmandu.
The plan is rough and I have time to go on side trips and follow interesting leads. Carroll and Tom have given me the names and numbers to their sherpa friends in the area so I’ll pop in and say ‘hi’ and see where those meetings go. Total length of the trip, between 20-25 days.
See you all soon!
(Photos: me and packing cat, gear, gear in bag, maps, Ama Dablam, Island Peak)
ZoomInfo
Himalayan Plans & Island Peak
Since I arrived in Nepal over a month ago I’ve seen what an Ontario flatlander like myself would call mountains around the Kathmandu valley. Tomorrow, however, I head off to see what Nepalis call mountains.
The trip starts with a flight into Lukla, the most dangerous airport in the world. If I survive that I’ll begin the trek north towards Namche Bazaar and then into the Everest region. My final destination on the first leg of the trip is Chukkung but on the way I’ll stop to stare at Ama Dablam.
Ama Dablam is one of the most beautiful mountains I’ve ever seen. It’s not the tallest (almost a full 2 vertical kilometres smaller than Everest) but it makes up for it in sheer beauty. I don’t know why I haven’t been able to get this mountain off my mind but I hope to find out by standing in front of it.
I’ll also be climbing a mountain, Island Peak – that’s the second leg. This definitely wasn’t in the original plans (as I have absolutely no mountaineering experience) but when someone mentioned flatlanders like me can climb Island Peak I took the opportunity.
Island Peak was named for it’s position, a lone peak in a sea of glaciers. It’s often called a “trekking peak” which is a little disingenuous, I think, as I’ve seen the pictures and at 6200m it looks like a proper mountain to me.
Both Island Peak and Ama Dablam are neighbours to Everest so I’ll do the 3-day roundtrip to basecamp and then make my way to Gokyo via the Cho La pass. (Gokyo is where most of the Everest panoramas being sold in shops were taken so the views are apparently stupendous). From Gokyo I’ll make my way back to Lukla and then Kathmandu.
The plan is rough and I have time to go on side trips and follow interesting leads. Carroll and Tom have given me the names and numbers to their sherpa friends in the area so I’ll pop in and say ‘hi’ and see where those meetings go. Total length of the trip, between 20-25 days.
See you all soon!
(Photos: me and packing cat, gear, gear in bag, maps, Ama Dablam, Island Peak)
ZoomInfo
Himalayan Plans & Island Peak
Since I arrived in Nepal over a month ago I’ve seen what an Ontario flatlander like myself would call mountains around the Kathmandu valley. Tomorrow, however, I head off to see what Nepalis call mountains.
The trip starts with a flight into Lukla, the most dangerous airport in the world. If I survive that I’ll begin the trek north towards Namche Bazaar and then into the Everest region. My final destination on the first leg of the trip is Chukkung but on the way I’ll stop to stare at Ama Dablam.
Ama Dablam is one of the most beautiful mountains I’ve ever seen. It’s not the tallest (almost a full 2 vertical kilometres smaller than Everest) but it makes up for it in sheer beauty. I don’t know why I haven’t been able to get this mountain off my mind but I hope to find out by standing in front of it.
I’ll also be climbing a mountain, Island Peak – that’s the second leg. This definitely wasn’t in the original plans (as I have absolutely no mountaineering experience) but when someone mentioned flatlanders like me can climb Island Peak I took the opportunity.
Island Peak was named for it’s position, a lone peak in a sea of glaciers. It’s often called a “trekking peak” which is a little disingenuous, I think, as I’ve seen the pictures and at 6200m it looks like a proper mountain to me.
Both Island Peak and Ama Dablam are neighbours to Everest so I’ll do the 3-day roundtrip to basecamp and then make my way to Gokyo via the Cho La pass. (Gokyo is where most of the Everest panoramas being sold in shops were taken so the views are apparently stupendous). From Gokyo I’ll make my way back to Lukla and then Kathmandu.
The plan is rough and I have time to go on side trips and follow interesting leads. Carroll and Tom have given me the names and numbers to their sherpa friends in the area so I’ll pop in and say ‘hi’ and see where those meetings go. Total length of the trip, between 20-25 days.
See you all soon!
(Photos: me and packing cat, gear, gear in bag, maps, Ama Dablam, Island Peak)
ZoomInfo
Himalayan Plans & Island Peak
Since I arrived in Nepal over a month ago I’ve seen what an Ontario flatlander like myself would call mountains around the Kathmandu valley. Tomorrow, however, I head off to see what Nepalis call mountains.
The trip starts with a flight into Lukla, the most dangerous airport in the world. If I survive that I’ll begin the trek north towards Namche Bazaar and then into the Everest region. My final destination on the first leg of the trip is Chukkung but on the way I’ll stop to stare at Ama Dablam.
Ama Dablam is one of the most beautiful mountains I’ve ever seen. It’s not the tallest (almost a full 2 vertical kilometres smaller than Everest) but it makes up for it in sheer beauty. I don’t know why I haven’t been able to get this mountain off my mind but I hope to find out by standing in front of it.
I’ll also be climbing a mountain, Island Peak – that’s the second leg. This definitely wasn’t in the original plans (as I have absolutely no mountaineering experience) but when someone mentioned flatlanders like me can climb Island Peak I took the opportunity.
Island Peak was named for it’s position, a lone peak in a sea of glaciers. It’s often called a “trekking peak” which is a little disingenuous, I think, as I’ve seen the pictures and at 6200m it looks like a proper mountain to me.
Both Island Peak and Ama Dablam are neighbours to Everest so I’ll do the 3-day roundtrip to basecamp and then make my way to Gokyo via the Cho La pass. (Gokyo is where most of the Everest panoramas being sold in shops were taken so the views are apparently stupendous). From Gokyo I’ll make my way back to Lukla and then Kathmandu.
The plan is rough and I have time to go on side trips and follow interesting leads. Carroll and Tom have given me the names and numbers to their sherpa friends in the area so I’ll pop in and say ‘hi’ and see where those meetings go. Total length of the trip, between 20-25 days.
See you all soon!
(Photos: me and packing cat, gear, gear in bag, maps, Ama Dablam, Island Peak)
ZoomInfo
Himalayan Plans & Island Peak
Since I arrived in Nepal over a month ago I’ve seen what an Ontario flatlander like myself would call mountains around the Kathmandu valley. Tomorrow, however, I head off to see what Nepalis call mountains.
The trip starts with a flight into Lukla, the most dangerous airport in the world. If I survive that I’ll begin the trek north towards Namche Bazaar and then into the Everest region. My final destination on the first leg of the trip is Chukkung but on the way I’ll stop to stare at Ama Dablam.
Ama Dablam is one of the most beautiful mountains I’ve ever seen. It’s not the tallest (almost a full 2 vertical kilometres smaller than Everest) but it makes up for it in sheer beauty. I don’t know why I haven’t been able to get this mountain off my mind but I hope to find out by standing in front of it.
I’ll also be climbing a mountain, Island Peak – that’s the second leg. This definitely wasn’t in the original plans (as I have absolutely no mountaineering experience) but when someone mentioned flatlanders like me can climb Island Peak I took the opportunity.
Island Peak was named for it’s position, a lone peak in a sea of glaciers. It’s often called a “trekking peak” which is a little disingenuous, I think, as I’ve seen the pictures and at 6200m it looks like a proper mountain to me.
Both Island Peak and Ama Dablam are neighbours to Everest so I’ll do the 3-day roundtrip to basecamp and then make my way to Gokyo via the Cho La pass. (Gokyo is where most of the Everest panoramas being sold in shops were taken so the views are apparently stupendous). From Gokyo I’ll make my way back to Lukla and then Kathmandu.
The plan is rough and I have time to go on side trips and follow interesting leads. Carroll and Tom have given me the names and numbers to their sherpa friends in the area so I’ll pop in and say ‘hi’ and see where those meetings go. Total length of the trip, between 20-25 days.
See you all soon!
(Photos: me and packing cat, gear, gear in bag, maps, Ama Dablam, Island Peak)
ZoomInfo
Himalayan Plans & Island Peak
Since I arrived in Nepal over a month ago I’ve seen what an Ontario flatlander like myself would call mountains around the Kathmandu valley. Tomorrow, however, I head off to see what Nepalis call mountains.
The trip starts with a flight into Lukla, the most dangerous airport in the world. If I survive that I’ll begin the trek north towards Namche Bazaar and then into the Everest region. My final destination on the first leg of the trip is Chukkung but on the way I’ll stop to stare at Ama Dablam.
Ama Dablam is one of the most beautiful mountains I’ve ever seen. It’s not the tallest (almost a full 2 vertical kilometres smaller than Everest) but it makes up for it in sheer beauty. I don’t know why I haven’t been able to get this mountain off my mind but I hope to find out by standing in front of it.
I’ll also be climbing a mountain, Island Peak – that’s the second leg. This definitely wasn’t in the original plans (as I have absolutely no mountaineering experience) but when someone mentioned flatlanders like me can climb Island Peak I took the opportunity.
Island Peak was named for it’s position, a lone peak in a sea of glaciers. It’s often called a “trekking peak” which is a little disingenuous, I think, as I’ve seen the pictures and at 6200m it looks like a proper mountain to me.
Both Island Peak and Ama Dablam are neighbours to Everest so I’ll do the 3-day roundtrip to basecamp and then make my way to Gokyo via the Cho La pass. (Gokyo is where most of the Everest panoramas being sold in shops were taken so the views are apparently stupendous). From Gokyo I’ll make my way back to Lukla and then Kathmandu.
The plan is rough and I have time to go on side trips and follow interesting leads. Carroll and Tom have given me the names and numbers to their sherpa friends in the area so I’ll pop in and say ‘hi’ and see where those meetings go. Total length of the trip, between 20-25 days.
See you all soon!
(Photos: me and packing cat, gear, gear in bag, maps, Ama Dablam, Island Peak)
ZoomInfo

Himalayan Plans & Island Peak

Since I arrived in Nepal over a month ago I’ve seen what an Ontario flatlander like myself would call mountains around the Kathmandu valley. Tomorrow, however, I head off to see what Nepalis call mountains.

The trip starts with a flight into Lukla, the most dangerous airport in the world. If I survive that I’ll begin the trek north towards Namche Bazaar and then into the Everest region. My final destination on the first leg of the trip is Chukkung but on the way I’ll stop to stare at Ama Dablam.

Ama Dablam is one of the most beautiful mountains I’ve ever seen. It’s not the tallest (almost a full 2 vertical kilometres smaller than Everest) but it makes up for it in sheer beauty. I don’t know why I haven’t been able to get this mountain off my mind but I hope to find out by standing in front of it.

I’ll also be climbing a mountain, Island Peak – that’s the second leg. This definitely wasn’t in the original plans (as I have absolutely no mountaineering experience) but when someone mentioned flatlanders like me can climb Island Peak I took the opportunity.

Island Peak was named for it’s position, a lone peak in a sea of glaciers. It’s often called a “trekking peak” which is a little disingenuous, I think, as I’ve seen the pictures and at 6200m it looks like a proper mountain to me.

Both Island Peak and Ama Dablam are neighbours to Everest so I’ll do the 3-day roundtrip to basecamp and then make my way to Gokyo via the Cho La pass. (Gokyo is where most of the Everest panoramas being sold in shops were taken so the views are apparently stupendous). From Gokyo I’ll make my way back to Lukla and then Kathmandu.

The plan is rough and I have time to go on side trips and follow interesting leads. Carroll and Tom have given me the names and numbers to their sherpa friends in the area so I’ll pop in and say ‘hi’ and see where those meetings go. Total length of the trip, between 20-25 days.

See you all soon!

(Photos: me and packing cat, gear, gear in bag, maps, Ama Dablam, Island Peak)

Update – September 6, 2013
It’s been a while since my last update but lots has happened. A visit to the world’s largest stupa in Boudha, the planning for a trip into the high mountains, and an earthquake.
The largest stupa in Boudha was quite the sight. Off the main road, nestled into the blocks and shops of town, you follow series of narrow alleyways leading to it which only make it’s impact more striking. The area around it is surrounded by merchants, restaurants, and cafés, many of which have 3rd floor patios which are worth heading to for the view. (The top photo was taken from a cafe.)
The Himalayan trip is an exercise in keeping realistic expectations. There’s so much to see and do that it’s easy to over commit and forget everything that can send a plan sideways – weather, infrastructure, getting sick. One place that is in every one of my plans is Ama Dablam so that puts me in the Everest region. Hopefully there’s enough time for a trip to the Annapurna region afterwards because that area was stage to many mountaineering stories as well.
Finally the earthquake. Seismologists have warned that another big earthquake will hit Nepal any day. People are quite concerned because the infrastructure is bad and the country is landlocked so help would be a long time coming (the government advises to stock 6wks of food). Last week’s was a 4.9 and very short so there was little damage. If anything it was a good thing, reminding people to go over their kits/plans and releasing some of the tension in the earth.
ZoomInfo
Update – September 6, 2013
It’s been a while since my last update but lots has happened. A visit to the world’s largest stupa in Boudha, the planning for a trip into the high mountains, and an earthquake.
The largest stupa in Boudha was quite the sight. Off the main road, nestled into the blocks and shops of town, you follow series of narrow alleyways leading to it which only make it’s impact more striking. The area around it is surrounded by merchants, restaurants, and cafés, many of which have 3rd floor patios which are worth heading to for the view. (The top photo was taken from a cafe.)
The Himalayan trip is an exercise in keeping realistic expectations. There’s so much to see and do that it’s easy to over commit and forget everything that can send a plan sideways – weather, infrastructure, getting sick. One place that is in every one of my plans is Ama Dablam so that puts me in the Everest region. Hopefully there’s enough time for a trip to the Annapurna region afterwards because that area was stage to many mountaineering stories as well.
Finally the earthquake. Seismologists have warned that another big earthquake will hit Nepal any day. People are quite concerned because the infrastructure is bad and the country is landlocked so help would be a long time coming (the government advises to stock 6wks of food). Last week’s was a 4.9 and very short so there was little damage. If anything it was a good thing, reminding people to go over their kits/plans and releasing some of the tension in the earth.
ZoomInfo
Update – September 6, 2013
It’s been a while since my last update but lots has happened. A visit to the world’s largest stupa in Boudha, the planning for a trip into the high mountains, and an earthquake.
The largest stupa in Boudha was quite the sight. Off the main road, nestled into the blocks and shops of town, you follow series of narrow alleyways leading to it which only make it’s impact more striking. The area around it is surrounded by merchants, restaurants, and cafés, many of which have 3rd floor patios which are worth heading to for the view. (The top photo was taken from a cafe.)
The Himalayan trip is an exercise in keeping realistic expectations. There’s so much to see and do that it’s easy to over commit and forget everything that can send a plan sideways – weather, infrastructure, getting sick. One place that is in every one of my plans is Ama Dablam so that puts me in the Everest region. Hopefully there’s enough time for a trip to the Annapurna region afterwards because that area was stage to many mountaineering stories as well.
Finally the earthquake. Seismologists have warned that another big earthquake will hit Nepal any day. People are quite concerned because the infrastructure is bad and the country is landlocked so help would be a long time coming (the government advises to stock 6wks of food). Last week’s was a 4.9 and very short so there was little damage. If anything it was a good thing, reminding people to go over their kits/plans and releasing some of the tension in the earth.
ZoomInfo
Update – September 6, 2013
It’s been a while since my last update but lots has happened. A visit to the world’s largest stupa in Boudha, the planning for a trip into the high mountains, and an earthquake.
The largest stupa in Boudha was quite the sight. Off the main road, nestled into the blocks and shops of town, you follow series of narrow alleyways leading to it which only make it’s impact more striking. The area around it is surrounded by merchants, restaurants, and cafés, many of which have 3rd floor patios which are worth heading to for the view. (The top photo was taken from a cafe.)
The Himalayan trip is an exercise in keeping realistic expectations. There’s so much to see and do that it’s easy to over commit and forget everything that can send a plan sideways – weather, infrastructure, getting sick. One place that is in every one of my plans is Ama Dablam so that puts me in the Everest region. Hopefully there’s enough time for a trip to the Annapurna region afterwards because that area was stage to many mountaineering stories as well.
Finally the earthquake. Seismologists have warned that another big earthquake will hit Nepal any day. People are quite concerned because the infrastructure is bad and the country is landlocked so help would be a long time coming (the government advises to stock 6wks of food). Last week’s was a 4.9 and very short so there was little damage. If anything it was a good thing, reminding people to go over their kits/plans and releasing some of the tension in the earth.
ZoomInfo

Update – September 6, 2013

It’s been a while since my last update but lots has happened. A visit to the world’s largest stupa in Boudha, the planning for a trip into the high mountains, and an earthquake.

The largest stupa in Boudha was quite the sight. Off the main road, nestled into the blocks and shops of town, you follow series of narrow alleyways leading to it which only make it’s impact more striking. The area around it is surrounded by merchants, restaurants, and cafés, many of which have 3rd floor patios which are worth heading to for the view. (The top photo was taken from a cafe.)

The Himalayan trip is an exercise in keeping realistic expectations. There’s so much to see and do that it’s easy to over commit and forget everything that can send a plan sideways – weather, infrastructure, getting sick. One place that is in every one of my plans is Ama Dablam so that puts me in the Everest region. Hopefully there’s enough time for a trip to the Annapurna region afterwards because that area was stage to many mountaineering stories as well.

Finally the earthquake. Seismologists have warned that another big earthquake will hit Nepal any day. People are quite concerned because the infrastructure is bad and the country is landlocked so help would be a long time coming (the government advises to stock 6wks of food). Last week’s was a 4.9 and very short so there was little damage. If anything it was a good thing, reminding people to go over their kits/plans and releasing some of the tension in the earth.